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Dominion Energy continues working to restore power


Columbia, SC (WOLO) —  Hurricane Ian slammed into the Palmetto State around 2 p.m. bringing heavy rain and gusts of wind that uprooted trees, left debris along roadways and caused downed power lines after making landfall in Georgetown, South Carolina at 85 miles per hour.

Energy officials say by 11 a.m. Friday morning they were already dealing with some 16 thousand homes without power, and by 4 p.m. Friday afternoon that number jumped at the height of the storm with more than 110 thousand customers without electricity. A majority of those outages were reported in Charleston and Summerville, although the Midlands saw its share of outages. The power company says they were able to cut the number of homes without electricity down to 70,000 customers by 5:30 p.m. Friday evening. A number officials tell us was constantly changing because of the ongoing weather.

The president of Dominion Energy South says this is one storm that was difficult to stay ahead of, even with 700 additional power crews helping from Tennessee and Maryland.

“Ian is one heck of a fickle and stubborn storm,” said Keller Kissam, president of Dominion Energy South
Carolina. “It couldn’t make up its mind where it wanted to go or how long it wanted to stay. That’s exactly
why we had to be prepared – and we urged our customers to be prepared – for whatever bite Ian would
bring. I want our customers to know that our crews will continue to work as hard and as long as we need
to until everyone has their lights back on. Please stay safe, and please be patient.”

If you or someone you know remains in the dark tonight, officials say the best way to report it is either by downloading their app, by going to their website
report outages by going to DominionEnergy.com or calling 800-251-7234.

At last check , (10:30pm Friday) the electric company reported 96,568 customers throughout the state who are still in the dark tonight.





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Getting insurance for cannabis businesses is doable, but not without conditions and costs


Acquiring insurance has proven difficult and costly for Vermont’s cannabis business owners. File photo by Glenn Russell/VT Digger

Vermont’s cannabis entrepreneurs face many heightened costs as they head into the legal recreational market that opens Saturday.

A particularly daunting one is insurance.

“Get your wallet out,” said Scott Sparks, who is planning to open Bud Barn, his store in Brattleboro, on Oct. 17. “It’s incredibly expensive.”

The Cannabis Control Board requires cannabis businesses to get “commercially reasonable” levels of insurance or place funds in escrow to cover potential liability.

If they are unable to secure insurance coverage, small growers must place at least $10,000 in escrow. Medium and large manufacturers and medium growers must place at least $50,000 in escrow. Retailers, wholesalers, integrated licensees, testing laboratories, small manufacturers and large growers must place at least $250,000 in escrow. 

Michael DeNault, an insurance broker with Charles River Insurance, an agency in Massachusetts that handles about 50 Vermont clients, said a small grower can get the minimum coverage for about $750 a year. 

But that insurance is the bare minimum. 

Louis Olave, managing partner of Good Harbor Solutions, a Burlington insurance agency with about 40 Vermont clients in the cannabis business, said cannabis businesses — like most businesses — need much more than the bare minimum to protect themselves.

If people are using their vehicle to transport their cannabis products, they have to get additional transportation insurance, Olave said.   

Insuring inventory poses its own challenges. Olave said insurance carriers require businesses to keep cannabis in a concrete vault or a wire mesh cage. 

Dave Silberman, a Middlebury attorney who advises cannabis businesses and is opening FLORA, a retail store in Middlebury on Saturday, said one insurance company would have required him to install a sprinkler system before it would cover him for theft.

“You tell me how that makes sense,” Silberman said. “I can understand having that for fire coverage, but it’s a little silly for theft.”

Then there is product liability insurance.

“Product liability is essential coverage, like somebody uses one of your products and they get sick, they can sue you because medically something happened to them,” Olave said. 

All that extra insurance can get expensive. Olave said some of his clients are paying nearly $30,000 in annual premiums.  

“It’s very expensive, for example, for a retail shop to get effective theft insurance,” Silberman said. “Because it’s a cash-heavy business and most insurance policies, the standard form only covers you for $10,000 of cash loss, and on a busy three-day weekend, a cannabis business might generate a couple hundred thousand dollars of cash, and so how do you get that insured?”

Sparks said just his down payment on the Bud Barn’s insurance policy’s premium is $10,000. 

Tito Bern, who has applied for retail, growing and manufacturing licenses, said it has been relatively easy to find insurance, despite the cost. He plans to buy an umbrella policy for “well over” $10,000 a year in premiums. His medium-sized growing operation alone will cost him $7,000 to $8,000 a year in premiums, he said, and that would not cover him for theft. 

“All you have to do is put the word ‘cannabis’ in front of something, and it immediately doubles,” Bern said of the costs involved in Vermont’s newest retail sector.

Brandon Pollock is chief executive officer of Theory Wellness, a Massachusetts and Maine company that is applying for a retail license in Brattleboro. When he co-founded the company five years ago, Pollock said, insurance was twice as expensive as it is now.

“It’s gotten better,” he said. “But it still carries a significant premium over any other normal business.” 

Olave said his is one of the few insurance agencies in Vermont that cover cannabis businesses.

No admitted insurance carriers — meaning carriers regulated by the Department of Financial Regulation — cover cannabis businesses in Vermont, according to Deputy Commissioner of Insurance Emily Brown. All the cannabis insurance is carried by surplus line carriers, she said. Surplus line carriers are not regulated by the department and are not eligible for reinsurance should they be unable to cover claims, she said. 

“Standard carriers don’t insure these types of things, so you have to go to a specialty carrier,” Olave said, noting that he works with seven insurance companies in the United States and globally that specialize in cannabis.

“There’s nothing on this planet that you can’t insure,” he said.

Vermont has many home cannabis businesses, and that requires a particular kind of insurance. It’s one reason so many have turned to DeNault, the Massachusetts broker.

DeNault said cannabis entrepreneurs, including the roughly 175 home-based growers in Vermont, should beware of existing home or business policies that do not specifically cover cannabis. Those carriers have the right to deny coverage if they find out that cannabis is involved, he said. DeNault said he has approached his clients’ home and business insurance companies to ask them to specifically include or exclude cannabis for clarity, but they refuse to provide that clarity. 

“These are the folks who provide homeowner policies to most of the state of Vermont or most of the policies to (non-cannabis) businesses,” DeNault said.

Olave said cannabis entrepreneurs have come to him to say that their insurance company dropped them.

“They called up and said: ‘Hey, I’m going to grow cannabis on my property, are you OK with that?’” Olave said.

When the insurance company said “no,” they were dropped, Olave said. 

“So we tell our clients, ‘Do not call your homeowners insurance company until you talk to us, because there’s other options out there.’”

Want to stay on top of the latest business news? Sign up here to get a weekly email on all of VTDigger’s reporting on local companies and economic trends. And check out our new Business section here.





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Moors murders mystery blown open as skull found in hunt for 12-year-old Keith Bennett | UK | News


Police are digging on Saddleworth Moor today for the body of Keith Bennett, a 12-year-old child and victim of the infamous Moors murderers. Detectives are believed to be preparing to exhume an area where the suspected skeletal remains of a child have been found.

The Moors murders were carried out by Ian Brady and Myra Hindley between July 1963 and October 1965 around Manchester.

Since the murders took place, four of the five victims’ bodies were found, but the location of Keith’s remained a mystery that the imprisoned serial killers would not reveal.

The search lost pace when both Brady and Hindley died, but the fresh revelations may offer hope of a breakthrough.

Police are now working to reopen a part of the moor after what experts believe to be a child’s upper jaw and a full set of teeth were reportedly uncovered.

He had been on the way to his grandmother’s house in Longsight, a suburb to the south-east of Manchester city centre, when she asked him to help her load boxes into her van.

Brady was in the back of the van; Hindley drove to Saddleworth Moor and Brady took Bennet away.

Brady returned thirty minutes later alone, carrying a spade he had hidden earlier. He told Hindley that he had sexually assaulted Keith and strangled him with string.

The other victims of the Moors murderers were Pauline Reade, 16, John Kilbride, 12, Lesley Ann Downey, 10, and Edward Evans, 17.

The latest developments from the police are said to come after investigative work by a team led by Russell Edwards, an author who claims to have solved the Jack the Ripper case.

He is said to have located the site – a few hundred yards from where the other victims were buried – after soil analysis suggested the presence of human remains.

Mr Edwards reportedly started digging on the site under the supervision of experts, and contacted the police after remains were found.

Dawn Keen, a forensic archaeologist involved with the dig, told the Mail when the find was made yesterday: “I do believe there are human remains there. They [the police] have got to look.

“From the photographs, I saw the teeth, I could see the canines, I could see the incisors, I could see the first molar.

“It is the left side of an upper jaw. There is no way that it is an animal.”

Mr Edwards described the moment he made the discovery, saying: “The smell hit me about two feet down. Like a sewer, like ammonia. It was on my clothes I stank of it.

“The soil reeked. I worked as a gravedigger when I was nineteen – that hits you, that smell of death. It is distinctive.”

He said he hoped the find would bring Keith’s family “peace” and “closure” after nearly sixty years.





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Planned Roadwork for Northwest Missouri, October 3 – 9


St. Joseph, Mo. – The following is a list of general highway maintenance and construction work the Missouri Department of Transportation has planned in the Northwest Missouri region for the week of Oct. 3 – 9.

All road closures and planned roadwork may be viewed on the Traveler Information Map at http://traveler.modot.org/map/.

Inclement weather may cause schedule changes in some of the planned work. There may also be moving operations throughout the region, in addition to the work mentioned below.

Atchison County

Interstate 29 – Bridge replacement project over the Nishnabotna River (mile marker 122 – 124) through November. Traffic is head-to-head in the northbound lanes. (Contractor: Phillips Hardy, Inc.) More info: https://www.modot.org/atchison-county-interstate-29-nishnabotna-river-bridge-rehabilitation *

I-29 – Patching and resurfacing project from Route 111 near Exit 107 to Exit 99 near Corning, through October. The road may be narrowed to one lane each direction in 2-mile increments. A 16-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Emery Sapp & Sons, Inc.)

U.S. Route 136 – Resurfacing project from the Missouri River to I-29 through November 2023. (Contractor: Phillips Hardy, Inc.)

U.S. Route 136 – Pothole patching from Rock Port to Tarkio, Oct. 3 – 7

Routes W and Z – Pothole patching, Oct. 3 – 7

Buchanan County

U.S. Route 36 – Bridge rehabilitation project over the Missouri River through December. One lane is closed each direction with a 12-foot width restriction westbound and a 15-foot width restriction eastbound. (Contractor: Comanche Construction, Inc.)

U.S. Route 36 – RAMPS CLOSED as part of a bridge rehabilitation project. The westbound on/off ramps at Route 759 (Stockyards Expressway) are closed through early December. (Contractor: Comanche Construction, Inc.)

I-29 – Guardrail repairs northbound at mile marker 43.8 and southbound at mile marker 46.5, Oct. 4, 7:30 to 11 a.m.

Caldwell County

I-35 – Resurfacing project from just north of Exit 52 in Cameron (Clinton County) to U.S. Route 69 (Exit 68, Daviess County), through October. (Contractor: Herzog Contracting Corp.)

Carroll County

U.S. Route 24 – Resurfacing project from U.S. Route 65 in Carrollton to east of Route 41, near DeWitt, through mid-October. A 12-foot width restricition is in place. (Contractor: Emery Sapp & Sons, Inc.)

U.S. Route 24/65 – Bridge rehabilitation project at the bridge over Route 10, Outer Road U.S. Route 24 and Norfolk Southern Railroad, south of Carrollton, through mid-December. The bridge is narrowed to one lane with temporary traffic signals guiding motorists through the workzone. An 18-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Capital Paving and Construction, LLC)

Route 10 – RAMP CLOSED for a bridge rehabilitation project. The ramp from Route 10 to northbound U.S. Route 24/65, south of Carrollton, is closed through mid-December. (Contractor: Capital Paving and Construction, LLC)

U.S. Route 24 – Bridge rehabilitation project at the Moss Creek Bridge, south of Carrollton, through December. The bridge is narrowed to one lane with temporary traffic signals guiding motorists through the workzone. An 18-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Capital Paving and Construction, LLC)

Route UU – CLOSED for a bridge deck replacement project over Turkey Creek and Big Creek, through December. (Contractor: Capital Paving & Construction, LLC)

Route B – Pothole patching from County Road 249 to U.S. Route 65, Oct. 3 – 7

Chariton County

U.S. Route 24 – Bridge deck replacement project at the Palmer Creek Bridge, west of Route MM near Brunswick, through December. An 11-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Emery Sapp & Sons, Inc.)

Route 129 – CLOSED for a bridge deck replacement project over the Chariton River, near Salisbury, through late November. (Contractor: Emery Sapp & Sons Inc.)

Route TT – CLOSED for a bridge deck replacement project at the Turkey Creek Bridge, 1 mile east of Route 139, through late November. (Contractor: Emery Sapp & Sons Inc.)

Route 5 – Bridge maintenance over Cottonwoood Creek, north of Keytesville, Oct. 3 – 6. Bridge will be narrowed to one lane around-the-clock, with temporary traffic signals to guide motorists through the work zone. A 12-foot width restriction will be in place.

Clinton County

I-35 – Resurfacing project from just north of Exit 52 in Cameron to U.S. Route 69 (Exit 68, Daviess County), through October. (Contractor: Herzog Contracting Corp.)

Route K – Pavement repair from U.S. Route 36 (DeKalb County) to 348th Street, Oct. 3. A 10-foot width restriction will be in place.

Route Z – Pavement repair from U.S. Route 169 to Reed Lane, Oct. 4. A 10-foot width restriction will be in place.

Route W – Pavement repair from Route 116 to 248th Street, Oct. 5m. A 10-foot width restriction will be in place.

Daviess County

I-35 – Resurfacing project from U.S. Route 69 (Exit 68) to just north of Exit 52 in Cameron (Clinton County), through October. (Contractor: Herzog Contracting Corp.)

Route P – Pothole patching, Oct. 3 – 4

DeKalb County

I-35 – Resurfacing project from U.S. Route 69 (Exit 68, Daviess County) to just north of Exit 52 in Cameron (Clinton County), through October. (Contractor: Herzog Contracting Corp.)

Route K – Pavement repair from U.S. Route 36 to 348th Street (Clinton County), Oct. 3. A 10-foot width restriction will be in place.

Grundy County

Route F – Pothole patching, Oct. 3 – 7

Harrison County

I-35 – Bridge rehabilitation project at the Pole Cat Creek Bridge at mile marker 90, south of Bethany, through November. A 12-foot width restriction is in place. More info: https://modot.org/harrison-county-interstate-35-pole-cat-creek-bridge-project  (Contractor: Widel, Inc.)*

Route ZZ – Pothole patching, Oct. 3 – 7

Holt County

U.S. Route 159 – Pavement improvement and flood remediation project from the Missouri River to the Little Tarkio Creek near Fortescue through December. A 12-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Phillips Hardy, Inc.)

U.S. Route 159 – Sealing project from the Little Tarkio River near Fortescue to Route 111 north of Forest City, Oct. 6 – 7. A 12-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Phillips Hardy, Inc.)

Route 111 – Pothole patching from Bates Street to Lone Elm Road, Oct. 3

Route T – Pothole patching from Commercial Street to 310th Street, Oct. 4

Linn County

U.S. Route 36 – Concrete replacement westbound from Route 11 in Brookfield to the Macon County line, Oct. 3 – 7. The road will be narrowed to one lane around-the-clock in various locations.  

Livingston County

U.S. Route 36 – Resurfacing project eastbound from Route C to Parson’s Creek, and westbound from Parson’s Creek to Coon Creek, through October. One lane may be closed around-the-clock in either direction. A 16-foot width restriction is in place. (Contractor: Herzog Contracting Corp.)

Route C – CLOSED until further notice at the Shoal Creek Bridge due to deterioration. A bridge replacement project is currently scheduled to be part of MoDOT’s November 2022 letting.

Nodaway County

Route NN – CLOSED for a culvert replacement from Katy Road to Kite Road, Oct. 3 – 7 , 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.

Route M – CLOSED for a culvert replacement from Route J to Route AE, Oct. 5, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Route E – Pothole patching, Oct. 3 – 7

Sullivan County

Route BB – Pothole patching, Oct. 3 – 7

* Indicates this bridge is included in Gov. Mike Parson’s $351 million Focus on Bridges program, which will repair or replace 250 bridges across the state.

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Car Break-ins Near Billings West Causing Frustrations


BILLINGS — Friday did not get off to a good start for Nadia Stryker.

“I came down and the whole window was smashed in and there was a hammer sitting right here on the dashboard,” she says.

Someone had broken into her brand-new Jeep which was parked on the street across from Billings West High.

It’s not the first time she’s been a victim of a car break-in since moving into the apartments. She says it’s happened two times before.

“I had glass all over my car and in my kid’s seats in the back,” she says.

The thief got away with Nadia’s wallet with her debit card inside but left everything else.

“Around eight o’clock we started getting emails of our card being used at Wal-Mart. So that was great,” she says.

She’s not the only one feeling the frustration of having their car broken into. Nick Kravitz is in Montana for a hunting trip and had been staying at a friend’s house only to find that his truck—parked near Nadia’s Jeep—had also had its windows broken out.

“Thank God I took my bow and my camera and my wallet inside and my camera bag—but I still had a couple of lenses in here and they took all my civilian clothes. They took two of my lenses. They took my drone. They took my binoculars. I calculate it to be about seven grand worth of stuff. How frustrating and maddening is that? It’s sad really. It makes me sick that people can steal. It’s really a kick in the knees” he says.

Police say they had reports of several cars being broken into in the same area overnight.





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North Korea fires two ballistic missiles toward sea



File video above: North Korea completed prep for new nuclear test, South Korea claimsNorth Korea on Saturday fired two short-range ballistic missiles toward its eastern waters, South Korean and Japanese officials said, making it the North’s fourth round of weapons launches this week that are seen as a response to military drills among its rivals.South Korea’s military said that it detected the two North Korean missile launches 18 minutes apart on Saturday morning coming from the North’s capital region. Japan’s Defense Ministry said it also spotted the launches.“The repeated ballistic missile firings by North Korea are a grave provocation that undermines peace and security on the Korean Peninsula and in the international community,” South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement.It said South Korea strongly condemns the launches and urges North Korea to stop testing ballistic missiles.Toshiro Ino, Japan’s vice defense minister, called the launches “absolutely impermissible.” He said the four rounds of missile testing by North Korea in a week is “unprecedented.”According to South Korean and Japanese estimates, the North Korean missiles flew about 220-250 miles at a maximum altitude of 20-30 miles before they landed in the waters between the Korean Peninsula and Japan.Ino, the Japanese vice minister, said the missiles showed “irregular” trajectory. The five other ballistic missiles fired by North Korea on three occasions this week also show similar low trajectories.Some experts say that the weapons are nuclear-capable, highly maneuverable missiles modeled after Russia’s Iskander missile. That Iskander-like missile is capable of striking strategic targets in South Korea, including U.S. military bases there.Saturday’s launches came a day after South Korea, Japan and the United States held their first trilateral anti-submarine drills in five years off the Korean Peninsula’s east coast. Earlier this week, South Korean and U.S. warships conducted bilateral exercises in the area for four days. Both military drills this week involved the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan and its battle group.North Korea views such military drills among its rivals as an invasion rehearsal and often responds with its own weapons tests.The North Korean missile tests this week also came before and after U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris visited South Korea on Thursday and reaffirmed the “ironclad” U.S. commitment to the security of its Asian allies.This year, North Korea has carried out a record number of missile tests in what experts call an attempt to expand its weapons arsenal amid stalled nuclear diplomacy with the United States. The weapons tested this year included nuclear-capable missiles with the ability to reach the U.S. mainland, South Korea and Japan.South Korean and U.S. officials say North Korea has also completed preparations to conduct a nuclear test, which would be its first in five years.Experts say North Korean leader Kim Jong Un eventually wants to use the enlarged nuclear arsenal to pressure the United States and others accept his country as a legitimate nuclear state, a recognition he views as necessary to win the lifting of international sanctions and other concessions.Multiple United Nations Security Council resolutions ban North Korea from testing ballistic missiles and nuclear devices. The country’s missile launches this year are seen as exploiting a divide at the U.N. council over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and U.S.-China competitions.In May, China and Russia vetoed a U.S.-led attempt to toughen sanctions on North Korea over its ballistic missile launches.“North Korea’s frequent short-range missile tests may strain the isolated state’s resources. But because of deadlock on the U.N. Security Council, they are a low-cost way for the Kim regime to signal its displeasure with Washington and Seoul’s defense exercises while playing the domestic politics of countering an external threat,” said Leif-Eric Easley, a professor at Ewha University in Seoul.

File video above: North Korea completed prep for new nuclear test, South Korea claims

North Korea on Saturday fired two short-range ballistic missiles toward its eastern waters, South Korean and Japanese officials said, making it the North’s fourth round of weapons launches this week that are seen as a response to military drills among its rivals.

South Korea’s military said that it detected the two North Korean missile launches 18 minutes apart on Saturday morning coming from the North’s capital region. Japan’s Defense Ministry said it also spotted the launches.

“The repeated ballistic missile firings by North Korea are a grave provocation that undermines peace and security on the Korean Peninsula and in the international community,” South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement.

It said South Korea strongly condemns the launches and urges North Korea to stop testing ballistic missiles.

Toshiro Ino, Japan’s vice defense minister, called the launches “absolutely impermissible.” He said the four rounds of missile testing by North Korea in a week is “unprecedented.”

According to South Korean and Japanese estimates, the North Korean missiles flew about 220-250 miles at a maximum altitude of 20-30 miles before they landed in the waters between the Korean Peninsula and Japan.

Ino, the Japanese vice minister, said the missiles showed “irregular” trajectory. The five other ballistic missiles fired by North Korea on three occasions this week also show similar low trajectories.

Some experts say that the weapons are nuclear-capable, highly maneuverable missiles modeled after Russia’s Iskander missile. That Iskander-like missile is capable of striking strategic targets in South Korea, including U.S. military bases there.

Saturday’s launches came a day after South Korea, Japan and the United States held their first trilateral anti-submarine drills in five years off the Korean Peninsula’s east coast. Earlier this week, South Korean and U.S. warships conducted bilateral exercises in the area for four days. Both military drills this week involved the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan and its battle group.

North Korea views such military drills among its rivals as an invasion rehearsal and often responds with its own weapons tests.

The North Korean missile tests this week also came before and after U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris visited South Korea on Thursday and reaffirmed the “ironclad” U.S. commitment to the security of its Asian allies.

This year, North Korea has carried out a record number of missile tests in what experts call an attempt to expand its weapons arsenal amid stalled nuclear diplomacy with the United States. The weapons tested this year included nuclear-capable missiles with the ability to reach the U.S. mainland, South Korea and Japan.

South Korean and U.S. officials say North Korea has also completed preparations to conduct a nuclear test, which would be its first in five years.

Experts say North Korean leader Kim Jong Un eventually wants to use the enlarged nuclear arsenal to pressure the United States and others accept his country as a legitimate nuclear state, a recognition he views as necessary to win the lifting of international sanctions and other concessions.

Multiple United Nations Security Council resolutions ban North Korea from testing ballistic missiles and nuclear devices. The country’s missile launches this year are seen as exploiting a divide at the U.N. council over Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and U.S.-China competitions.

In May, China and Russia vetoed a U.S.-led attempt to toughen sanctions on North Korea over its ballistic missile launches.

“North Korea’s frequent short-range missile tests may strain the isolated state’s resources. But because of deadlock on the U.N. Security Council, they are a low-cost way for the Kim regime to signal its displeasure with Washington and Seoul’s defense exercises while playing the domestic politics of countering an external threat,” said Leif-Eric Easley, a professor at Ewha University in Seoul.



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Albuquerque homicide investigation after one found dead



The Albuquerque Police Department’s homicide unit has taken over an investigation after someone was found dead following reports of shots fired. APD deputies arrived in the area of Wyoming and Central and found one person dead. The shooting happened shortly before 2 p.m. Friday. The investigation is ongoing.This is a breaking news story and will be updated as more information becomes available

The Albuquerque Police Department’s homicide unit has taken over an investigation after someone was found dead following reports of shots fired.

APD deputies arrived in the area of Wyoming and Central and found one person dead. The shooting happened shortly before 2 p.m. Friday.

The investigation is ongoing.

This is a breaking news story and will be updated as more information becomes available



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Oklahoma City man re-arrested, charged for four murders in 2013



OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – An Oklahoma City man was arrested Thursday and charged with the murders of four people dating back almost a decade.

Daniel Green, 40, was initially charged with the 2013 murders after the crime occurred. However, those charges were dismissed, and he was put in a mental institution.

Now, he’s facing those same charges once again.

“He took something, something pure,” said Mario Dominguez in 2013. “Innocence of this earth.”

Dominguez told KFOR in 2013 that he knew Green.

That same year his 7-month-old son, step daughter, fiancé, and fiancé’s mother were all allegedly shot and killed by Green in a southeast Oklahoma City home that they all shared.

“I didn’t think he would do anything like this to our family,” Dominguez said in 2013.

He was arrested and charged with murder at the time, but those charges were dismissed in 2016 because he was found to be incompetent.

“Meaning do they understand the nature of the charges against them and are they able to help their attorney in their defense,” said local attorney Ed Blau.

Green was sent to a mental institution instead. He was a diagnosed schizophrenic with a history of violence.

Eventually, he no longer met criteria to be held there because he was taking his medications as required. At that point, KFOR was told Green was supposed to be handed to the sheriff’s office. It is unclear if that happened.

Fast forward to this week. Green was taken into custody and his arrest report stated he was homeless. Blau said that competency can fluctuate, especially if someone leaves an institution and is no longer on their medication.

“I assume if this case ends up going to trial and competency is no longer an issue, I would be surprised if the defense attorney did not raise an insanity issue,” Blau said. “Meaning he didn’t know right from wrong at the time of the incident.”

Jeff Dismukes, with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, said it’s all about trying to prevent getting to this point.

“This really kind of illustrates the need to ensure that those services are available before anybody ever becomes engaged,” Dismukes said. “Try to intervene earlier and treat those diseases before they become something more serious.”

Green is now once again facing four counts of first-degree murder for the 2013 deaths.

We did reach out to the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office to see if they could fill in the blanks after Green was released. We’re told they are checking into it.

If you or anyone you know if suffering through a mental health crisis, be sure and call the number 988 to get the help you need.



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Sharks in danger | ABC6


(NOAA)

JAMESTOWN, R.I. (WLNE) — There are so many sizes and types of sharks around the world. From the ancient Greenland shark that can live hundreds of years to the docile leopard shark, sharks are simply fascinating. They’re also vitally important to the ecosystem of the oceans.

Dr. Jason Ramsay, shark expert and associate professor of biology at Westfield State University, explained sharks are very common. If you’ve been in the ocean, you’ve probably been near a shark.

Even with their prevalence in the ocean, many species of shark are at serious risk. According to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, 37% of sharks and rays are listed as threatened. Their numbers are dropping fast because they can’t reproduce fast enough and in large enough numbers to outpace their dwindling populations.

Unlike the abundance of fish that can produce hundreds of eggs at a time, sharks are very different. Sharks do not reach sexual maturity for 15 years. In addition, they invest a lot of time with reproduction, and don’t produce a lot of offspring compared to most fish.

The main problem is the number of sharks being taken out of the population has become much, much bigger than the numbers they can produce.

The biggest threat to sharks is commercial fisheries. As commercial fisheries cast their nets for a target species, sharks following these fish to feed accidentally get caught as well. Hundreds of thousands of sharks are killed per day as this bycatch. A rate that is simply unsustainable. There are currently 19 species of shark that are illegal to catch because their numbers are so low.

Ramsay recommends the book Why Sharks Matter by Dr. David Shiffman to better understand the important role sharks play in the ecology of the oceans, the economy of the coast and how to help save them.





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